A Guide to ADA Designs

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ADA (The Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990) requires reasonable accommodations to the known physical or mental limitations of disabled employees. While specific regulations used in determining if office furnishings are accessible can vary based on several factors, here are some options to help understand ways to make your school, business or office more ADA compatible.

Countertop Height Table
ADA accessible acience tables provide proper height
ADA accessible science tables provide proper height and increased kneespace to enable participation.
Tables or countertops that are between 28” and 34” high provide accessible work surfaces for an ADA compliant reception desk that allows easy wheelchair access.



ADA Wheelchair Icon
Kneespace that provides adequate ADA knee room
Kneespace of at least 27” high, 30” wide and 19” deep provides adequate ADA knee room.
Desks with adjustable legs can accommodate wheelchair access
Desks with adjustable legs can be set for oversized height to accommodate wheelchair access.
Fixed-leg Table With Apronless Design
Fixed-leg tables with apronless designs provide additional space to allow for wheelchair clearance.
Countertop Hieght Table
Tables or countertops that are between 28” and 34” high provide accessible work surfaces for an ADA compliant reception desk that allows easy wheelchair access.

ADA Wheelchair Icon
ADA accessible acience tables provide proper height
ADA accessible science tables provide proper height and increased kneespace to enable participation.
Kneespace that provides adequate ADA knee room
Kneespace of at least 27” high, 30” wide and 19” deep provides adequate ADA knee room.
Desks with adjustable legs can accommodate wheelchair access
Desks with adjustable legs can be set for oversized height to accommodate wheelchair access.
Fixed-leg Table With Apronless Design
Fixed-leg tables with apronless designs provide additional space to allow for wheelchair clearance.